A character analysis of the story the plague

Another colleague of Dr. Othon A police magistrate of Oran who is strict and severe with everyone, including his children. A figure of quiet stability, peace, and kindness. Castel An elderly colleague of Dr.

A character analysis of the story the plague

Characters[ edit ] The Narrator: He is a seventy-five-year-old Spaniard with a rugged face, who comments on events in Oran that he hears about on the radio and in the newspapers.

Castel is one of Rieux's medical colleagues and is much older than Rieux. He realizes after the first few cases that the disease is bubonic plague and is aware of the seriousness of the situation.

He works hard to make an antiplague serum, but as the epidemic continues, he shows increasing signs of wear and tear. Cottard lives in the same building as Grand.

He does not appear to have a job and is described as having private means although he describes himself as "a traveling salesman in wines and spirits. Afterwards, he does not want to be interviewed by the police since he has committed a crime by attempting suicide and fears arrest.

Cottard's personality changes after the outbreak of plague. Whereas he was aloof and mistrustful before, he now becomes agreeable and tries hard to make friends. He appears to relish the coming of the plague, and Tarrou thinks it is because he finds it easier to live with his own fears now that everyone else is in a state of fear, too.

Cottard takes advantage of the crisis to make money by selling contraband cigarettes and inferior liquor. As the epidemic wanes, Cottard's mood fluctuates. Sometimes he is sociable, but at other times, he shuts himself up in his room.

A character analysis of the story the plague

Eventually, he loses his mental balance and shoots at random at people on the street, wounding some and killing a dog. The police arrest him. Garcia is a man who knows the group of smugglers in Oran. He introduces Rambert to Raoul. Gonzales is the smuggler who makes the arrangements for Rambert's escape and bonds with him over football.

Joseph Grand is a fifty-year-old clerk for the city government. He is tall and thin. Poorly paid, he lives an austere life, but he is capable of deep affection.

In his spare time, Grand polishes up his Latin, and he is also writing a book, but he is such a perfectionist that he continually rewrites the first sentence and can get no further.A Journal of the Plague Year study guide contains a biography of Daniel Defoe, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Literature Study Guides The Plague Characters. The Plague | Study Guide Albert Camus. Study Guide Dr. Bernard Rieux is a doctor in Oran and the narrator of the story. Read More: Jean Tarrou: Context Character Analysis.

Cite This Study Guide. A summary of Analysis in Albert Camus's The Plague. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Plague and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in , that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran.

It asks a number of questions relating to the nature of destiny and the human condition. Informed, Nuanced Analysis on Libya. Libya-Analysis® is a one-of-a-kind consultancy organisation with years of experience producing evidence-based analysis, forecasting and research on schwenkreis.com help our clients make sense of the latest political, economic, commercial and security developments in Libya and provide both background information and real time insights into the complex dynamics.

Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death" In writing a story of this nature, Poe would have considered such historical examples as the Black Death or the bubonic plague of the Middle Ages as well as the cholera epidemics that ravaged Philadelphia in the 's and Baltimore in his own lifetime.

However, in this story, the plague takes the unusual form of a red death rather than a black.

Camus, Albert | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy